Posts Tagged: Helen Frankenthaler

WOMEN OF ABSTRACT EXPRESSIONISM AT THE MINT MUSEUM

“A work of art is the trace of a magnificent struggle.” -Grace Hartigan

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Antigone I, 1958, by Ethel Schwabacher. © Estate of Ethel Schwabacher

In celebration of the 80th Anniversary of the Mint Museum, the museum is presenting works of extraordinary women from around the world. The women artists being celebrated have broken boundaries with their creativity and innovation. These rebellious risk takers are finally being recognized with a blockbuster exhibition. When the curators at the Mint first mentioned the possibility of this exhibition years ago, we were in the process of searching for acquisitions for the Mint Museum Auxiliary which was started by a group of trailblazing women in the 1950s, the same time period in which Abstract Expressionism started.  We were elated to acquire Grace Hartigan’s Scotland that year, and now the circle is complete with this group of Hardigan’s peers (and more of her own paintings) coming to the Mint Museum this week.

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Scotland, 1960, by Grace Hartigan, Gift of the Mint Museum Auxiliary

Women of Abstract Expressionism is the first major museum exhibition to focus on the groundbreaking women artists affiliated with the Abstract Expressionist movement during its seminal years, between 1945 and 1960. Organized by the Denver Art Museum , this important project brings together approximately 50 major works of art by twelve of the key women involved with the movement on both the East and West Coasts. The large-scale, colorful, and energy-filled canvases in the show, lent by major museums, private collectors, and artist estates, are certain to thrill and inspire museum visitors. Women of Abstract Expressionism includes canvases by such well-known artists as Helen Frankenthaler, Lee Krasner, Elaine de Kooning, Joan Mitchell, and Grace Hartigan, as well as works by their colleagues Perle Fine, Jay DeFeo, Sonia Getchoff, Deborah Remington, Ethel Schwabacher, Mary Abbott, and Judith Godwin, whose work is currently gaining renewed appreciation. The exhibition focuses on the expressive freedom of direct gesture and innovative artistic process that was at the core of the movement, while exploring each artist’s highly personal response to particular memories and experiences. The Mint Museum is one of just two additional venues for this not-to-be-missed show, which makes a significant contribution to art historical scholarship and constitutes a rare opportunity for visitors to see so many key works of modern art together in one place.

This exhibition is presented to the community by Wells Fargo Private Bank. Additional generous support provided by Duke Energy, Electrolux, the Mint Museum Auxiliary, and Davidson College.

FINALLY, RECOGNITION FOR THE WOMEN OF ABSTRACT EXPRESSIONISM
by Liz Logan August 8, 2016 for 1st Dibs Introspection

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Attention shifts from “the paint-splattered man” to the trailblazing female AbEx artists in a new show at the Denver Art Museum.

In the 1950s, artist Sonia Gechtoff had a breakthrough moment at an exhibition that included paintings by Clyfford Still. Encountering Still’s Abstract Expressionist technique flipped a switch inside her. “I was so excited that it took me awhile to get it straightened out in my head,” recalls the 89-year-old New Yorker, who up until that point had been a realist painter. “There was so much freedom and openness. It was thrilling that you could discover something personal directly on the canvas, without adhering to a recognizable subject.” Gechtoff adopted the gestural style, and over the past six decades, her work has been exhibited internationally and acquired by major collections.

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Sonia Gechtoff felt welcomed by galleries in San Francisco, where she began her career in the early 1950s, but she says the New York art scene seemed closed off to women. Gechtoff is among the 12 oft-overlooked artists currently getting their due in the Denver Art Museum’s “Women of Abstract Expressionism” (photo courtesy of Sonia Gechtoff).

Yet she and other women of the AbEx movement aren’t household names like their male counterparts Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko and Barnett Newman, although many of them were equally involved in the art world of the time. The Denver Art Museum’s exhibition “Women of Abstract Expressionism,” on view until September 25, seeks to bring these female artists out of the shadows once and for all.

“Historically, this movement has always been about the paint-splattered man,” declares Gwen Chanzit, DAM’s curator of modern art. “In museums and textbooks, the story has been limited, and so many big, first-rate paintings have been left out.” A number of AbEx women earned critical acclaim when they were active and had their work featured in high-profile exhibitions, such as the famed 1951 Ninth Street Show. They experimented vigorously, developed their own styles and produced significant bodies of work. But the recognition they received still paled beside that accorded their male peers. Sexism is one reason these women were overlooked, but family and household responsibilities also led to inconsistent careers, and societal pressure even drove some to destroy their canvases.

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Hudson River Day Line, 1955, by Joan Mitchell. © Estate of Joan Mitchell

The exhibition focuses on 12 key women artists, displaying multiple works by each. In addition to Gechtoff, they include Mary Abbott, Jay DeFeo, Perle Fine, Helen Frankenthaler,Judith Godwin, Grace Hartigan, Elaine de Kooning, Lee Krasner, Joan Mitchell, Deborah Remington and Ethel Schwabacher. Only a handful of them — notably, Frankenthaler and Mitchell — are widely known.

Abstract Expressionist painting was characterized by direct, exuberant gestures — strikingly rich, textural brushstrokes that took advantage of every inch of the canvases, which were generally large. The movement, which was influenced by the fluidity of European Surrealism, gave birth to a uniquely American art form that was influential around the world.

“Unlike, say, a Cubist painting, you cannot teach someone how to make a painting like this,” Chanzit says. “These paintings are deeply personal responses to things that moved these individuals — an event, a place, literature, poetry and the like.”

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Mary Abbott, shown here ca. 1950, continues to work every day in her Hamptons studio at age 95. Photo courtesy McCormick Gallery, Chicago

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All Green, 1954, by Mary Abbott. © Mary Abbott

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Bullfight, 1959, by Elaine de Kooning, © Elaine de Kooning Trust

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The Seasons, 1957, by Lee Krasner. Photo by Sheldon C. Collins. © 2015 Pollock-Krasner Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

De Kooning’s Bullfight (1959) grew out of her experience of that violent Spanish tradition, while Krasner’s The Seasons (1957) is clearly a celebration of the botanical world. Although the women adhered to the same artistic principles, each one’s style was distinct.

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The Beginning, 1960, by Sonia Getchoff,© Sonia Getchoff

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Epic, 1959, by Judith Godwin, Photo by Lee Stalsworth,© Judith Godwin

Gechtoff’s The Beginning (1960), which was inspired by angels depicted in an Italian fresco, includes many colors applied with a profusion of smallish brushstrokes, while in Godwin’s Martha Graham — Lamentation (1956), the brushstrokes evoke the bold choreography of Graham, her friend, to whom the work is a tribute.

Within a movement that, as Chanzit observes in the exhibition catalogue, was defined by the “heroic machismospirit,” the women’s approach was perhaps more personal than that of their male counterparts. Many of the women were painting in response to nature, she writes, in contrast to Pollock, who famously declared, “I am nature.” Strikingly few of the paintings in the exhibition are untitled, suggesting the artists’ openness and willingness to provide viewers with hints to their subjects and their thinking. Frankenthaler was once asked why she titled her works, and she responded, “Because a title has to have a meaning,” Chanzit notes.

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Frankenthaler, seen in her New York studio in 1951, is one of the few well-known female Abstract Expressionists. Photo by Cora Kelley Ward, © 2016 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation

While Abstract Expressionism valued freedom, this did not imply a liberated view of gender roles and equality. “As women, we were basically told to go home,” recalls Godwin, who is in her mid-80s and still painting in New York. She studied with the influential German painter Hans Hofmann(as did Frankenthaler) and showed in major galleries in New York. “I stuck around and so did other women,” she says.

Gechtoff began her career in the early ’50s in San Francisco, where the Beat movement encouraged openness and experimentation. She recalls being welcomed into the art galleries on Fillmore Street, including the respected Six Gallery. A few years later, she moved to Manhattan and was shocked to find that the New York art scene “seemed truly closed off to women.” She remembers male artists looking her up and down at parties. “The hostility bothered me so much that I removed myself from the community more than I should have, and I regret that,” she says.

For Krasner, who was married to Pollock, and de Kooning, who was married to Willem de Kooning, their husbands’ fame gave them a certain status in the artistic community, but it also had drawbacks. Krasner, whose work has gained wider appreciation in recent years, lived in her husband’s shadow. “In some cases, the women pushed the men out in front of them,” Chanzit says, “because that’s just how it was back then.”

Although some AbEx artists have garnered more esteem than others, the movement itself has been hailed as a triumph of American painting, and it has been studied continuously since its heyday. For Gechtoff, the AbEx approach is as compelling now as it was when she first viewed Still’s paintings. “It’s an adventure,” she muses, “that’s never ending.”

THE MINT MUSEUM COMMEMORATES 80 YEARS OF ART AND INSPIRATION WITH THE YEAR OF THE WOMAN

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DERING HALL: WIRED & INSPIRED FEATURING CATHERINE M. AUSTIN INTERIOR DESIGN

“Culture just seems to be in the air, like part of the weather.” – Tom Wolfe on New York City

Cathy Austin Dering Hall Rendering

Welcome to my virtual “Artists Salon” for Dering Hall’s Wired & Inspired Showhouse in collaboration with the Atlanta Decorative Arts Center! When asked to design a space inspired by my favorite city, I let my imagination run wild creating my fantasy penthouse in New York City.  Be sure to click here to see the rest of the showhouse on Dering Hall including spaces by Angie Hranowsky, Beth Webb, Cathy Kincaid, James Wheeler Designs, Cloth & Kind, Tammy Connor, Yvonne McFadden, Melanie Millner, and Karen Ferguson.

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INSPIRATION

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INSPIRATION IMAGE: WILLEM DE KOONING’S ART STUDIO

Living in New York City in my twenties made an indelible impression on me.  I felt like I had encountered the center of the creative universe that attracted the most talented, imaginative, and artistic people I had ever met. Since space was so precious and provided solace from the grind of city living, I became fascinated with how people treated their interiors. I used to fantasize about my “dream” apartment and this is my version of heaven…a penthouse overlooking the Chrysler Building, surrounded by a blend of iconic furnishings and paintings by my favorite abstract expressionists that also came to New York for inspiration. Whenever I need to get my creative juices flowing, New York is always my city of choice…taking in the latest exhibitions, observing what is happening on the streets, and soaking up the vibe of the city.

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WIILEM DE KOONING/ Gotham News, 1955, oil on canvas

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HELEN FRANKENTHALER

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HELEN FRANKENTHALER / Tutti-Fruitti, 1966, acrylic on canvas,

COLOR PALETTE

A double height penthouse overlooking the Manhattan skyline is the perfect backdrop to showcase the works of my favorite artists.  The Farrow & Ball color palette of the interior was inspired by the city lights, bold colors in the paintings, and Babe Paley’s infamous “taxi cab yellow” living room decorated by Dean of American Decorating Albert Hadley.

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PRODUCT SELECTIONS

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LARGER PRODUCT IMAGES

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The large scaled embroidered linen kaleidoscopic pattern used for the drapery illustrates the creative process of Patrick Frey who is constantly playing with shapes and colors to keep his work fresh and exciting much like the Abstract Expressionists featured on the walls.

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On the pillows, another multicolored fabric by Pierre Frey depicts Japanese theatre masks, yet also evokes Picasso’s Les Desmoiselles D’Avignon at MOMA.

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The Jean de Merry chandelier reflects the edgy glamour of the city.

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The Clint sofa by Bradley in  Yves Klein blue  provides the perfect perch to absorb the city views and priceless works of art by Helen Frankenthaler and Willem DeKooning.b12a8bd3a8c5ab63e96caceece9904f2

An ebony and gilt Origami cocktail table by Angelo Donghia adds a 70s/ Halston-esque vibe to the space.

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A hand crafted hide rug by Kyle Bunting is a work of art on its own, yet the small scale of the pattern plays off of solid upholstery fabrics and large scale of the drapery fabric.

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A pair of “Hadley” lamps by Chrisopher Spitzmiller pay homage to legendary NYC interior designer Albert Hadley while the touch of black punctuates the bold palette of the interior.

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A Cuff Console by Natasha Baradaran plays with negative space and becomes another work of art placed against the taxi cab yellow walls.

A very special thank you to artist Becky Clodfelter for bringing my interior to life with her amazing talent!

For more design inspiration, please be sure to follow along on Instagram, Pinterest, Facebook, Twitter, and subscribe to Bespoke Banter.  Thanks for reading and please come back again!

 

BOOK CLUB: FALL NEW RELEASES FOR FASHION, DESIGN, & ART LOVERS

“Books are the bees which carry the quickening pollen from one to another mind.” – James Russell Lowell

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Fashion, design and art lovers will be thrilled to see the upcoming new releases this fall. Take a peek at some of the press releases of highly anticipated titles that will be making their debut shortly…click on each cover to pre-order.

FOR THE FASHIONISTA

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A sumptuous monograph tracing the life and legacy of fashion luminary Oscar de la Renta. In October 2014 one of the fashion world’s champions, Oscar de la Renta, passed away, a great loss brightened by the innumerable successes of his half-century reign. The acclaimed fashion designer dressed first ladies from Kennedy to Obama, and celebrities from Beyoncé to Sarah Jessica Parker. Renowned for his unique charm, impeccable taste, and original lifestyle, he married the highest standards of French couture with the ultimate motivation that women must look and feel beautiful. In this intimate volume, longtime editor and friend André Leon Talley recounts de la Renta’s journey through nearly 70 iconic dresses, mainly made for private clients, accompanied by fascinating stories of the exquisite craftsmanship and the legendary friends that brought each gown to life. Born in the Dominican Republic in 1932, de la Renta left for Madrid at nineteen to study art, where he rose to prominence as a sketch artist for newspapers and fashion houses. From his apprenticeship under Cristóbal Balenciaga to his eponymous collections, the designer’s simple lines elevated with a flamenco dancer’s flourish reflect his deep connection to his roots and his commitment to transcendence through beautiful garments.

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The first comprehensive and lavishly illustrated volume to document the influences and life work of Manolo Blahnik, one of the most influential and talked-about icons in contemporary fashion. Featuring more than forty years of shoe design, this is the definitive monograph of the work of Manolo Blahnik, one of the titans of contemporary fashion. This book is a comprehensive survey of Blahnik’s work and provides access to never-before-seen photography of his designs. Drawing inspiration from the worlds of architecture, art, film, and literature, Blahnik is a master of the art of the shoe. His exciting use of color, unprecedented designs, and exquisitely sculpted heels make his shoes some of the most coveted in the world. Featuring more than 250 iconic designs from his archive, the book reveals for the very first time the inspirations behind his singular artistic vision. With insightful chapters devoted to Blahnik’s most powerful relationships and inspirations—including Marie Antoinette, Diana Vreeland, Cecil Beaton, Spanish and Italian film, the works of Goya and Velázquez and the Prado Museum—this book is a personal look into the man behind the shoes. Beautiful photography and thoughtful essays by fashion writers, curators, and colleagues give readers a unique opportunity to access Blahnik’s vivid and creative-filled world.

roma_1_1Since 2008, the renowned Italian fashion house of Valentino has been anchored by creative directors Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccioli, who have moved the house’s aesthetic forward with their contemporary feminine designs. Chiuri and Piccioli are two personalities with very different design viewpoints, yet they blend these contrasts into a timeless mélange of clean simplicity and modern elegance. One of Chiuri and Piccioli’s most profound inspirations is Rome itself, the Eternal City. Its seamless blend of ancient and modern, pagan and baroque, historic buildings and contemporary lifestyle reflects their own distinctive approach in which heritage, tradition, and innovation coexist to create a new concept of the house of Valentino.

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The work of one of the most influential and innovative hat designers of this century. Philip Treacy’s career over the last two decades has been prolific and high-profile. A visual delight, this book shares Treacy’s favorite designs in 250 striking photographs, curated by Treacy himself, and showcases his collaborations and personal relationships. Treacy has said, “Every hat I have ever made has begun in my mind as a photograph. I can see it on the model, at the right angle, before I even begin.” Indeed, his hats have been photographed by the most iconic image makers of our time, including Patrick Demarchelier, Richard Avedon, Steven Meisel, Mario Testino, Bruce Weber, and Irving Penn. And his hats have been modeled on equally famous heads, ranging from Grace Jones and Lady Gaga to the Duchesses of Cornwall and Devonshire. Since his early friendships with Isabella Blow and Alexander McQueen, Treacy’s imaginative designs have been a synthesis of art and fashion, with materials ranging from silk and lace to Plexiglas and leather, trimmed with feathers or Swarovski crystals. Combining luxury and sophistication, his work has helped shape modern fashion. This first, highly personal book is a glamorous tour through Treacy’s world, and documents how a hat can evoke the magic of life and speak to the transformative power of fashion.

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Fashion designer Lela Rose presents an inspiring manifesto for creative and stylish twenty-first-century entertaining. Known for her whimsical fashions, Lela Rose is also a popular and passionate hostess. From the spirited Couples’ Cook-off to a kid-friendly “Primp Your Ride” bike picnic, to an elegant Silver-and-White Christmas dinner, in this book she presents dozens of creative ideas to inspire readers looking for a fresh take on entertaining. Rose’s philosophy is simple: create your own occasions to create your own fun. The themes, colors, seasonality, and activities she concocts for each of her parties show you to how dazzle guests with simple yet unexpected touches. Modernize the traditional bridal shower with a refreshingly retro sewing circle. Turn a ladies’ tea on its head by having girlfriends over for an afternoon tequila tasting. Celebrate your favorite cause by hosting a festive outdoor supper, like the one featured on a Brooklyn rooftop garden. Featuring unique ideas for decoration, recipes for cocktails and key dishes, and tips for throwing everything together in an easy and enjoyable way, Prêt-a-Party will be embraced by a new generation of hosts and hostesses seeking spirited and unconventional good times

FOR THE DESIGN DOYENNE

Carrier and Company COVER

“We often joke that Jesse and Mara are like contributing editors to my own private magazine. Both at Vogueand at home, they always bring a grand vision to the table—along with invaluable expertise and an impeccable eye. It continues to amaze me that they managed to turn a series of broken-down barns into a wonderful compound for my family.” — Anna Wintour

Jesse Carrier and Mara Miller, the principals of Carrier and Company Interiors, are a husband-and-wife design duo who create rooms that are a confident mix of timeless and contemporary design—familiar and fresh at once. Always refined and sophisticated, the Carriers’ work ranges in style from elegantly traditional to luxuriously minimalist. Their rooms often features subtle patterns and neutral palettes punctuated by bursts of exuberance and unexpected mixes of high and low, old and new. Whether decorating a sprawling country house or a Tribeca loft, a winter home in Florida or an apartment in a converted New York printing house, the Carriers’ mission is to connect people with place and combine their tailored, carefully edited and curated approach with the clients’ collections, artwork, taste, and personality, creating exquisitely detailed yet comfortable and personalized spaces.Illustrated with some 275 full-color photographs and featuring a foreword by Anna Wintour, Carrier and Company: Positively Chic Interiors introduces the reader to the Carriers’ unique aesthetic and shows why they are the designers of choice for so many of the country’s most discriminating arbiters of taste. It will undoubtedly be the standout decorating book of the year.

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The legendary interior design firm Parish-Hadley Associates set the standard for American style in the finest homes for more than three decades, from the 1960s through the 1990s. Throughout its colorful history, Parish-Hadley was commissioned by the most prestigious families in the country, from the Kennedys at the White House to the Astors, Rockefellers, and Gettys. Yet the fertile partnership between Parish and Hadley also greatly influenced the taste, style, creative process, and practices of the designers who worked for them. In this volume, 30 of the most renowned designers relate in detail their personal experiences working at the firm, accompanied by images they have chosen of their own work, past and present, illustrating how their designs were shaped by Parish-Hadley.Written by the inimitable Brian McCarthy and Bunny Williams.

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Celebrated interior designer Suzanne Rheinstein focuses on the use of rooms—from entries to outdoor spaces—that reflect her relaxed, elegant style, in which beauty and comfort are paramount. Suzanne Rheinstein is a master at translating traditional style into something fresh and elegant. In Rooms for Living, she shows how to achieve a calm and livable environment in casual or more formal settings. Rheinstein presents welcoming rooms to share with others, as well as private, cozy spaces for relaxing or sleeping.  Included are examples of refashioned spaces, such as a neglected living room that has been repurposed for reading and writing, and a kitchen that has been expanded to accommodate informal meals. Rheinstein also offers innovative ideas on how to make a statement with an entryway by adding vibrant color, dress a bed for ultimate comfort and romance with luxurious pillows, display books in an understated way, and create a unique party atmosphere. No small detail is overlooked. Beautifully photographed, this inspiring book is a must-have for design-savvy individuals.

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An appealing approach to creating elegant, worldly interiors that are rooted in the comforts of home. Interior designer Timothy Whealon is beloved for his accessible style, his seamless blend of classic and modern influences, and his skillful use of artwork and antiques, thanks to an extensive knowledge of fine and decorative arts. Whealon’s design philosophy finds its roots in classicism; however, he approaches each project with a fresh, twenty-first-century eye that makes it both modern and timeless. He doesn’t believe in interiors that look “decorated,” as if everything has been done at once. Rather, he layers items from different periods and cultures, artfully mixing the pristine and the patinated. This book is the first to showcase Whealon’s interiors, from an airy New York penthouse to a gracious Mediterranean-style villa to a casual beach cottage. Whether urban or rural, grand or intimate, each project exhibits classicism alongside comfort, careful attention to detail, and undeniable appeal. Many of the projects included have been newly photographed for this book, and each is a testament to Whealon’s exquisite taste and understanding of how people live today.

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In this richly illustrated style guide from an unabashed hoarder of all things beautiful, design editor and entertaining expert Eddie Ross reveals his insider secrets to creating exciting interiors, table settings and parties with chic and accessible finds that celebrate who you are and what you love. Featuring never-before-published photographs of Eddie’s own homes―his eclectic apartment in New York and Pine Hill Farm in Connecticut―Modern Mix cracks the code to navigating thrift shops, yard sales and flea markets with confidence. Funny and insightful, Eddie is like a trusted friend on the front lines of flea markets and thrifting, telling you what to look for, where to find it and how to restore it. Then he shows you how to use color and pattern to infuse your finds with a fresh, playful spirit, combining high and low, new and old, classic and modern elements into a warm and inviting style that expresses your personality. With more than 350 full-color photographs, time-saving tips and real-life shortcuts to decorating and entertaining beautifully on a budget, Modern Mix will open your eyes to the extraordinary possibilities within your reach and inspire you to live every day colorfully and creatively.

FOR THE ART AFICIONADO

fridakahlo-1Frida Kahlo was not only an iconic artist, she was also a bold beauty and an avant-garde fashionista whose timeless sense of style continues to inspire and influence the worlds of fashion, media, and art today. Fashion is an optical effect that Frida knew how to employ with shrewd intelligence and artistic intention. Frida knew that life is theater, and fashion was her costume. Frida understood the importance of image and attitude, no matter who you are.The canvas was Frida’s mirror, and she was the painter, the model, and the painting—author, subject, medium, and object. Frida was her own best work of art.

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Taking Helen Frankenthaler’s 1950s New York debut as its starting point, “The heroine Paint”: After Frankenthaler, a new publication edited by Katy Siegel, follows Frankenthaler’s own painting as well as the immediate influence of Frankenthaler’s work on other artists, tracing artistic currents gathered under her name as they move outwards in different directions over time. The book collects scholarly essays, texts from contemporary artists, reprints of historical writing, and interweaves these voices with a visual chronology that locates key works from performances, publications, and cultural ephemera for over seven decades.“The heroine Paint”: After Frankenthaler will offer a wealth of historical information and promises to be an important resource for young artists, as well as critics, curators, and art historians of modern and contemporary art. The wealth of archival imagery from cultural as well as artistic sources, and the elegance of the writing promise to make the book accessible and compelling as well to a general art audience.

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This definitive monograph from the Musée Rodin in Paris on the pioneering artist who paved the way for modern sculpture is now available in an affordable compact format. Revered today as the greatest sculptor of all time, whose expressive style prefigured that of the modernist movement and abstract sculpture, Auguste Rodin (1840–1917) stirred up much controversy during his lifetime, and his sculptures often met with hostility and incomprehension from his peers. This monograph traces the life and work of the artist, from his youth and early poverty-stricken years of apprenticeship to his most celebrated works—The Kiss, The Thinker, The Gates of Hell—which have become veritable icons; and from his passionate and tumultuous relationship with Camille Claudel to his extraordinary studio, working methods, and sources of inspiration, and his final years marked by war and illness. Written by experts from the Musée Rodin in Paris, this richly illustrated volume includes drawings, watercolors, engravings, and archival documents, as well as specially commissioned photographs of Rodin’s sculptures, completed by a chronology, bibliography, and history of the Musée Rodin—housed in the artist’s former studio in the Hôtel Biron. Providing insight into the many facets of his creative genius, this new compact edition of the Musée Rodin’s definitive reference on the artist and his oeuvre coincides with museum’s reopening in September 2015.

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The work of one of the most influential and innovative hat designers of this century. Philip Treacy’s career over the last two decades has been prolific and high-profile. A visual delight, this book shares Treacy’s favorite designs in 250 striking photographs, curated by Treacy himself, and showcases his collaborations and personal relationships. Treacy has said, “Every hat I have ever made has begun in my mind as a photograph. I can see it on the model, at the right angle, before I even begin.” Indeed, his hats have been photographed by the most iconic image makers of our time, including Patrick Demarchelier, Richard Avedon, Steven Meisel, Mario Testino, Bruce Weber, and Irving Penn. And his hats have been modeled on equally famous heads, ranging from Grace Jones and Lady Gaga to the Duchesses of Cornwall and Devonshire. Since his early friendships with Isabella Blow and Alexander McQueen, Treacy’s imaginative designs have been a synthesis of art and fashion, with materials ranging from silk and lace to Plexiglas and leather, trimmed with feathers or Swarovski crystals. Combining luxury and sophistication, his work has helped shape modern fashion. This first, highly personal book is a glamorous tour through Treacy’s world, and documents how a hat can evoke the magic of life and speak to the transformative power of fashion.

For more design inspiration, please follow along on Instagram, Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter and subscribe to Bespoke Banter.  Thanks for reading and please come back again!

10 QUESTIONS FOR THE SISTERHOOD OF THE WORLD BLOG AWARDS

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Holly Phillips, blogger and designer extraordinaire, announced that she had been nominated for the Sisterhood of the World Blog Awards (SOWBA) by Sarah Sarna a few days ago. Holly shared her list of 10 nominees of which I am one. Thank you to my travelling/design partner in crime!

A Sisterhood of the World Blog nomination means I now answer Holly’s 10 questions, select 10 new bloggers, and then ask them my own 10 questions. I love interviewing design talents for my Creative Minds series and this is a great way to ask some of my blogger pals the same questions!

1. What is your perfect paint color?

imageBenjamin Moore Fruit Shake- a perfect pink with a touch of coral like the inside of a conch shell. It complements all complexions and it is a great background for art. It also pairs well with just about every finish from black lacquer to gilt to antique mirror.

2. If you could have any job besides the one you have right now, what would it be?imageArtist, dancer or surf bum

3. If you could pick any designer, living or dead, to decorate your house, who would it be?image

Jacques Grange– A complete original and the ultimate design icon.

4. What is your dream trip?

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Surfing Safari around the world

5. Best meal of your life?

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For me the setting and company are just as important as the food to make a meal extraordinary. My fondest dining experience was at Le Gaiac at Le Toiny in St. Barths celebrating our fifth anniversary. We were supposed to be there for our honeymoon and a hurricane hit so we ended up in Bermuda. Going back for an anniversary made the milestone ( and the delayed gratification)  that much more special!

6. Pick an all time favorite movie and an all time favorite book that you think we should all watch and read?

Movie- The glamourous side of Interior Design featuring the best interiors and wardrobe that rarely exist anymore!

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Book-Who wouldn’t want a palace on the Grand Canal and canoodle with all the greatest artists of the 20th century?!?

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7. Best gift you have ever received?

For my baby shower, my college girlfriends each wrote a note to my future daughter wishing her well and relaying their craziest memories of her future mama. I am waiting until her rebellious teenage (or college) years to reveal these embarrassing stories!

8. Favorite wallpaper?

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The exquisite handmade papers by Fromental make me weak in the knees! I adore all of their chinoiserie and 20th century designs. Here Paradiso in Fern shows how a classic chinoiserie pattern can feel contemporary with a bold color palette.

9. If you could rewind twenty years and give yourself one piece of advice, what would it be?

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10. Chicest Hotel that you have visited or seen?

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Nestled in a courtyard off Place des Vosges in Le Marais, Le Pavillion de la Reine feels like your own pied a terre in Paris. Inaugurated in 1612 under the name of Place Royale, the Place des Vosges was built on Henri IV’s initiative who died before the works were even completed. Once the Place was ready, Le Marais soon became the Mecca of high Society gatherings with the likes of Mme de Sévigné, Racine, La Fontaine and Molière. The hotel, slightly set back from the famous Place, was coined its name in honour of Anne of Austria who once stayed in the wing standing between the hotel and the Place des Vosges.

11. Piece of art that you most covet?

imageLa Tristesse du Roi-Henri Matisse

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ANYTHING by Helen Frankenthaler…especially this work from the Fort Worth Modern

I nominate the following lovely ladies…

Marisa Marcontonio of Stylebeat

Jennifer Boles of The Peak of Chic

Jeanne Chung of Cozy, Stylish, Chic

Michelle Workman of Furnishing a Fabulous Life

Julia Buckingham of Material Girls

Danielle Rollins

Liza Tobias Sharp of Trellis Home

Denise McGaha

Jennifer Mehitidash of Dec-a-Porter

Sara Eilers of Lucas Eilers

And now for MY questions….

1. If you had a theme song, what would it be?

2. What is your idea of bliss?

3. What was your latest creative breakthrough?

4. What would be your dream vacation?

5. What is your secret vice?

6. What is your favorite design trick?

7. What would people be most surprised to learn about you?

8. What is at the top of your bucket list?

9. If you could own any work of art in the world, what would it be?

10. What is your favorite interior of all time?

Have fun ladies!

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