Posts Tagged: Clarence House

DESIGN BOARD: CATHERINE M. AUSTIN INTERIOR DESIGN IN CHARLOTTE HOME DESIGN & DECOR

It is always a treat to see one’s own work in print. We were thrilled to see the latest issue of Charlotte Home Design & Decor featuring us in one of my favorite columns where they showcase a different designer each month. Read below for our favorite finds s scouted from around the world…

ATLANTA HOME AND LIFESTYLES: 2018 SOUTHEASTERN DESIGNER SHOWHOUSE & GARDENS

We are delighted to be participating in the Southeastern Designer Showhouse & Gardens which opens this week!  Not only am I glad to have a reason to spend more time in my hometown, but I am also beyond excited to spend time with so many other favorite design friends that are also designing spaces in this year’s showhouse. Atlanta is at her finest during April and May.  When I first began contemplating the design scheme for our rooms,  I wanted to incorporate the glorious spring shades that reveal themselves each week a new flower or tree begins to bloom. For the past several weeks, we have been feverishly working to pull together our bedroom, bathroom, and hallway that all began with this spring palette…

I wanted to create a fantasy bedroom where I would look forward to waking up each morning surrounded by everything I love. I am a colorist at heart…color energizes me, comforts me, and evokes joy for me. The palette was inspired by some of my fondest travel memories of the past year. I kept coming back to certain images I had taken where the indescribable colors stayed with me. I was continually drawn to the combination of spring green with shades of lilac and orchid. 

2016 PANTONE COLORS OF THE YEAR: ROSE QUARTZ AND SERENITY

I was over the moon to hear that PANTONE had selected not one, but two of my favorite colors to be the 2016 Colors of the Year: a soft pink and an blue known as “Rose Quartz” and “Serenity.” This is the first time PANTONE has selected two colors to represent the Color of the Year.

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Leatrice Eiseman, Executive Director of the PANTONE Color Institute, elaborates, “Rose Quartz is a persuasive yet gentle tone that conveys compassion and a sense of composure. Serenity is weightless and airy, like the expanse of the blue sky above us, bringing feelings of respite and relaxation even in turbulent times. As consumers seek mindfulness and well-being as an antidote to modern day stresses, welcoming colors that psychologically fulfill our yearning for reassurance and security are becoming more prominent. Joined together, Rose Quartz and Serenity demonstrate an inherent balance between a warmer embracing rose tone and the cooler tranquil blue, reflecting connection and wellness as well as a soothing sense of order and peace.”

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I am constantly looking at my photographs for design inspiration. Sometimes I am aware of what is inspiring me and other times, it is not until after I have completed an interior that I realize the source. It was not until a favorite design blogger Carmen Natschke of The Decorating Diva  brought up the connection to PANTONE’s “Color of the Year, that I realized from where my inspiration originated. My “happy place” is Sayulita, a small surfing/fishing village  on the Nayarit Riviera in Mexico. I have spent hours gazing at this horizon watching it transform into a myriad of pinks and blues from sunrise to sunset.

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I am drawn to the same colors in art that I am in nature, which was the starting point for this bedroom I designed for the 2015 Traditional Home Junior League of High Point this past spring. It all began with a painting…

I envisioned my “imaginary” client as the sophisticated daughter of the family. She is well-travelled, artistic, and likes a modern, yet glamourous room that still reflects her Southern roots. A portrait by favorite artist, Kate Long Stevenson, (from Hidell Brooks Gallery) became my muse for the project. I had her in mind whenever I was making decisions for the space. The portrait and the large vintage abstract provided the color palette that inspired the design scheme. The room is a blend of unique pieces from High Point based craftsmen along with a collection from her travels around the world. A Moroccan inspired headboard, Murano glass lamps, original modern art, bespoke linens, dressmaker detailed drapery, and glamorous materials such as shagreen, agate, brass, and velvet add to the feminine mystique of the space. I indulged myself with an “imaginary” trip around the world for inspiration for the space…from the palaces of Morocco and India to the Murano glass factories and sunsets on the Nayarit Riviera.

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Pale blue walls and a high gloss pale pink ceiling evoke the Sayulita sky. The colors are repeated throughout the space in the fabrics, paintings, lamps, flowers, accessories, and finishes. The “Jaipur” print by Clarence House brings the palette together on the headboard and dust ruffle adorned with bespoke Leontine Linens.  A Brunschwig & Fils linen velvet reflects the Rose Quartz on the ceiling. Pink Murano glass lamps by Louis Gaskill and accessories by Addison Weeks continue the theme. Cream and gilt furnishings by Bernhardt provide a neutral backdrop.

Vintage watercolors from Gillian Bryce at 214 Modern Vintage and an over scaled 1970s abstract from Darnell & Company add dimension and layers to the space. A deeper shade of pink pulled from the fabrics and the art is used at the window and on the antique settee. Brass light fixtures by Aerin Lauder for Circa Lighting highlight the space. A gilded iron chair by Celerie Kemble for Henredon is dressed in a deep lavender velvet from Kravet. Accessories from Made Goods in lavender snakeskin and jade linen add an exotic touch to the space while an Indonesian elephant looks right at home in her painted glory.

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ROSE QUARTZ AND SERENITY PAIRINGS:

Whether in soft or hard surface material, the pairing of Rose Quartz and Serenity brings calm and relaxation. Appealing in all finishes, matte, metallic and glossy, the engaging combo joins easily with other mid-tones including greens and purples, rich browns, and all shades of yellow and pink. Add in silver or hot brights for more splash and sparkle

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MARKET READY: CATHERINE M. AUSTIN INTERIOR DESIGN IN OCTOBER TRADITIONAL HOME

Participating in the Traditional Home / Junior League of High Point Showhouse in April was one of the most gratifying experiences I have had in my career. I The creativity and camaraderie of the design community blew me away and seeing it in print brings back a flood of fond memories! We have all been anxiously awaiting the October issue to share all of our hard work for a wonderful cause…benefiting the Junior League’s community programming for High Point. Thank you to all of the gracious editors at Traditional Home, the countless volunteers from the Junior League and the amazing sponsors that brought our visions to life! Click here to read the full story and see the complete portfolio of images.

I want to especially thank Bernhardt Furniture, Stanton Carpet, Made Goods, Circa Lighting, Pratt & Lambert, Addison Weeks, and Hidell Brooks Gallery that loaned and donated pieces for the space.

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DAUGHTER’S BEDROOM BY CATHY AUSTIN BY CLARA HANEBERG

The final stop on the second floor is Cathy Austin’s beautiful daughter’s bedroom. Blessed with great bones—note the 10 1/2-foot ceilings and swoonworthy windows—the space is impeccably tailored from head to toe. Shaped valances mimic the Moroccan scalloping on the patterned headboard.

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Circa Lighting’s brass orb chandelier and the pillows’ chopstick monogram reiterate the room’s Eastern influence. Overhead, Pratt & Lambert’s pale-pink paint in high-gloss finish complements the vintage Murano glass lamp on the bedside table. A tufted-velvet bench with Lucite legs and an antique English settee updated in sumptuous animal print round out the dazzling sanctuary.

There’s a lot to love in these beautiful showhouse bedrooms…click on the image below for a video tour of the spaces.

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Interior designer: Cathy Austin, Catherine M. Austin Interior Design, 3300 Stanwyck Court, Charlotte, NC 28211; 704/517-8622, catherinemaustin.com.

BEFORE:

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I envisioned my “imaginary” client as the sophisticated daughter of the family. She is well-travelled, artistic, and likes a modern, yet glamourous room that still reflects her Southern roots. A portrait by favorite artist, Kate Long Stevenson, (from Hidell Brooks Gallery) became my muse for the project. I had her in mind whenever I was making decisions for the space. The portrait and the large vintage abstract provided the color palette that inspired the design scheme. The room is a blend of unique pieces from High Point based craftsmen along with a collection from her travels around the world. A Moroccan inspired headboard, Murano glass lamps, original modern art, bespoke linens, dressmaker detailed drapery, and glamorous materials such as shagreen, agate, brass, and velvet add to the feminine mystique of the space. I indulged myself with an “imaginary” trip around the world for inspiration for the space…from the palaces of Morocco and India to the Murano glass factories and sunsets on the Nayarit Riviera.

AFTER:

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BEHIND THE SCENES:

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Playing with scale and color to find the best vignette.Painting by Alexis Walter , Accessories from Made Goods, Necklaces from Janet Gregg and Candyshop Vintage

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Installation: Day One with Libby Langdon and Lisa Mende

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A few of my favroite things…Louise Gaskill vintage Murano Glass lamp, Addison Weeks brass turtle, Made Goods linen wrapped box , and Bernard Segal watercolor from 214 Modern Vintage

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Amethyst color blocking atop Bernhardt’s sleek Jet Set brass etagere

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Ombre ranunculus by John Lupton

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Press preview with Kara Cox, Libby Langdon, Leslie Moore, Mickey Sharpe, and Christine Barbour

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Channelling our “imaginary client” with the lovely Kara Cox

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Thinking Pink: Opening Gala with Meg Braff

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SOURCES:

  • Wall paint (“Pavanne” #25-26); trim paint (“Ancestral” 320-1); ceiling paint (“Coy Pink” #3-28): Pratt & Lambert, prattandlambert.com.
  • Chandelier (“Ceiling Light” #ARN5002, by Aerin): Circa Lighting, circalighting.com.
  • Area rug (“Addison”/Headwind #69619): Stanton, stantoncarpet.com.
  • Headboard; settee (antique); bench (designed by Cathy Austin): Catherine M. Austin Interior Design, catherinemaustin.com.
  • Headboard and dust ruffle fabric (Jaipur”/Pastel #34455-2); settee fabric (“Okapi”/Red #34705-3): Clarence House, clarencehouse.com.
  • Bed linens (Ivory Birdseye with Blush Linen); monogram (“Chopstick”): Leontine Linens, leontinelinens.com.
  • Drapery, pillow (“Principal” #54357-14): fabricut, fabricut.com.
  • Drapery banding (“Mondo”/Zephyr); settee pillow (“Bistro”/Cloud): Norbar Fabrics, norbarfabrics.com.
  • Settee pillow applique (“Madame Wu”/Cream): Schumacher, fschumacher.com.
  • Bench fabric (linen velvet): Brunschwig & Fils, brunschwig.com.
  • Nightstand (“Salon Nightstand” #341-216): Bernhardt, bernhardt.com.
  • Etagere (“Jet Set Entrtainment Pier”): Bernhardt, bernhardt.com
  • Nightstand lamp: Louise Gaskill Co., louisegaskill.com.
  • Vanity: Barbara Barry for Henredon, henredon.com
  • Vanity Chair: Cassandra by Celerie Kemble for Henredon, henredon.com
  • Vanity lamps: (Bristol Table lamps by Aerin): Circa Lighting, circalighting.com
  • Yarn painted Huichol skull: Evoke the Spirit, evokethespirit.com
  • Chair fabric: (Versailles velvet # E29606): Kravet, kravet.com
  • Watercolor by nightstand (by Bernard Segal): Gillian Bryce/214 Modern Vintage, 214modernvintage.com.
  • Portrait: Kate Long Stevenson, Hidell Brooks Gallery, hidellbrooksgallery.com
  • Garden Seat, Obelisks, Sculpture, Boxes, Ceramic Figure: Made Goods, madegoods.com
  • Flowers: John Lupton
  • Drapery: Custom Window Treatment
  • Upholstery: Cornerstone Upholstery
  • Photography: Dustin Peck

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PREVIEW THE 2015 ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST OSCARS GREEN ROOM

Article and images via Architectural Digest…

While you are watching Hollywood’s biggest night of the year, be sure to take note of the fabulous Architectural Digest Green Room! Over one billion film buffs, fashionistas, and design lovers will be tuned in as well….ENJOY!

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Created by the L.A. design studio Commune, with assistance from actress Julianne Moore, the Architectural Digest Oscar Greenroom is floored with Antium brushed limestone tile by Walker Zanger. The tile complements brick walls painted in a Sherwin-Williams Emerald interior acrylic latex in alabaster and neutral Shepperton and Neves carpets from Stark. Furnishings include seating by Holly Hunt, including a Holly Hunt Studio Haka director’s chair and Christian Astuguevieille Ilorg armchair. A Samsung Galaxy Tab S tablet lies on a Holly Hunt Caste Bridger bronze table. A custom-designed banquette lining the main wall is upholstered in a Clarence House fabric and accented with pillows in velvets and velours.

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With a nod to the iconic designs of the 1950s and ’60s, the Greenroom features a picture window composed of 16 Samsung LED displays that stream a sweeping view of L.A. from atop the Hollywood Hills as the city changes from day (shown) to night.

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Banked with tropical plants, an Oscar statue stands in a niche beside the Greenroom’s Samsung LED display picture window (here showing a night scene).

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A geometric-shaped bar crafted of Caesarstone’s Calacatta Nuvo is flanked by Holly Hunt Studio’s Marteau barstools.

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The Greenroom’s custom-made doors are inspired by the designs of Frank Lloyd Wright and are accented with Emtek hardware. This section of the Greenroom is outfitted with a Holly Hunt Studio table, a custom-designed chandelier from Remains Lighting, and Bernardaud porcelain on the console table.

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In keeping with Commune’s indoor-outdoor concept, the patio area features a built-in banquette with seat cushions and pillows covered in Perennials outdoor fabrics. Sutherland’s 500-pound African table by John Dickinson is complemented by the firm’s Salão lounge chair.

OSCAR FUN FACTS

0
Number of competitive Oscars won by a host of high-profile actors, actresses, and filmmakers, including Leonardo DiCaprio, Brad Pitt, Ian McKellan, Amy Adams, Julianne Moore, Bette Midler, Alfred Hitchcock, Stanley Kubrick, and George Lucas, among many others.
1
Number of dollars for which an Oscar winner or his estate must offer to sell his statuette back to the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences before selling the statuette on his own. Oscars awarded after 1950 are bound by this agreement, and statuettes are considered property of the Academy unless it waives its ownership. Oscar Welles’s 1941 Oscar for “Citizen Kane” was sold at a 2011 auction for over $800,000.
2
Number of words in the shortest Oscars acceptance speech ever, delivered by Patty Duke in 1963 after winning the Best Supporting Actress statuette for “The Miracle Worker.” Her message? Simply, “Thank you.”
3
Number of films that have won all of the “Big Five” awards (picture, director, actor, actress, and screenplay). They are: “It Happened One Night” (1934), “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” (1975), and “The Silence of the Lambs” (1991).
3
Number of animated features that have been nominated for Best Picture. 1991’s “Beauty and the Beast” was the first to earn this distinction, followed later by “Up” (2009) and “Toy Story 3” (2010).
4
Highest number of acting Oscars won by a single person, a record held by Katharine Hepburn. She won Best Actress statuettes for: “Morning Glory” (1933), “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner” (1967), “The Lion in Winter” (1968), and “On Golden Pond” (1982).
4
The most Best Director wins by one person, a record held by John Ford since 1953, when he won his last statuette for “The Quiet Man.”
5.5
Length in minutes of the longest Oscar acceptance speech ever given, a distinction held by Greer Garson, who won Best Actress in 1943 for “Mrs. Miniver.”
8
Highest number of acting nominations without a win, a record held by the late Peter O’Toole. He was awarded an honorary Oscar in 2002.
10
Number of musicals that have won Best Picture. The last one to do it was 2002’s “Chicago,” which ended a 34-year drought. 1968’s “Oliver!” preceded “Chicago”‘s win, but the Academy took a hard turn away from song-and-dance features with its subsequent Best Picture selection: “Midnight Cowboy” (1969), which remains the only X-rated film to claim Oscar’s biggest prize.
11
Highest number of Oscars won by a single film. Three movies are tied for this distinction: “Ben-Hur” (1959), “Titanic” (1997), and “The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King” (2003). “Return of the King” won all 11 awards for which it was nominated, another Academy Awards record.
11
Highest number of nominations for a film that did not win any Oscars. Two films share that dubious distinction: “The Turning Point” (1977) and “The Color Purple” (1985).
12
The highest number of Best Director nominations received by one person. William Wyler holds that record, converting three of those nominations into wins.
12
The number of Oscar categories that have been eliminated over the years. They include Best Dance Direction, Best Short Film — Live Action — Two Reels, and Best Unique and Artistic Quality of a Production. (That latter wordy category was part of the first Academy Awards ceremony in 1929, and ditched the following year.)
15
Length in minutes of the first — and to this day, shortest — Academy Awards ceremony, held on May 16, 1929 at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel in Los Angeles. Awards (the nickname “Oscar” didn’t come into being for several years) were handed out in 12 categories. Today, Oscars are awarded in 24 categories, and ceremonies typically run three hours on average. (Many far exceed that running time.)
17
Highest number of hosts for one Oscars telecast. For several years, the Academy used a gimmick dubbed “Friends of Oscar” that featured a roster of rotating hosts for each ceremony. The broadcast featuring the most “Friends” took place on April 7, 1970, and included stars like Bob Hope, John Wayne, Barbra Streisand, Fred Astaire, Clint Eastwood, James Earl Jones, and Elizabeth Taylor. Packing in so much star power paid off for the Academy: the broadcast was the Awards’ highest-rated telecast of all time.
18
Highest number of acting nominations for a single person, a record held by Meryl Streep. Streep broke the previous record of 12, set by Katharine Hepburn. Jack Nicholson is the most nominated male actor, currently tied with Hepburn’s 12.
19
Highest number of Oscar ceremonies hosted by one person. Bob Hope is the champ (he also hosted the first televised Oscars in 1953), with Billy Crystal a distant second with nine hosting gigs.
20
Most nominations for a single person in any category without a win. Sound re-recording mixer Kevin O’Connell began his unsuccessful quest for an Oscar with his first nomination in 1983; his most recent letdown came in 2007.
21
Composer Victor Young has O’Connell beat in the most depressing distinction category: Young was nominated 21 times before finally winning an Oscar for 1956’s “Around the World in 80 Days,” earning him the title of most nominations before a win. Unfortunately, Young died before the Oscar ceremony took place, and the award was granted posthumously.
22
Number of times that the Best Picture and Best Director Oscars have gone to different films. The most recent split came in 2013, when Ang Lee won Best Director for “Life of Pi” and “Argo” (directed by non-nominee Ben Affleck) took Best Picture. For more analysis of this Oscar anomaly, check out Moviefone’s extensive coverage here.
22
Total number of Oscars won by Walt Disney, the most ever for a single person. He was also awarded an additional four honorary Oscars, and holds the record for most Oscars won in one year by a single person (four). The most Oscars won by a living person is eight, with composer Alan Menken claiming the title.
35
Highest number of nominations earned by a woman in any category. Costume designer Edith Head holds that title; she won eight statuettes throughout her career.
45
Number of seconds that Academy rules stipulate acceptance speeches must not run over. (This rule, established in 2010, is broken multiple times every year.)
59
Highest number of nominations for a single person in any category. Over-achiever Walt Disney holds that title. Composer John Williams is the most-nominated living person, with 49 nods under his belt.
94
Length in minutes of the shortest Best Picture winner ever, “Marty” (1955). Brevity seems to be a theme for this classic flick: the 1956 ceremony where it claimed the top prize was the second-shortest Oscars ever, lasting just 90 minutes.
224
Length in minutes of the longest Best Picture winners ever: a tie between “Ben-Hur” (1959) and “Gone With the Wind” (1939). But the latter has a slight edge when its score is factored in: including its overture, intermission music, and exit music, “Gone” clocks in at 238 minutes.
263
Length in minutes of the longest Academy Awards ceremony ever, which took place on March 24, 2002. The historic night — hosted by Whoopi Goldberg — saw Halle Berry become the first African-American to win Best Actress (for “Monster’s Ball”), while fellow black actors Denzel Washington and Sidney Poitier also picked up statuettes for Best Actor and an honorary Oscar, respectively.
2,894
Number of total Oscar statuettes awarded from 1929 to 2011, in 1,853 categories.
6,000
The approximate number of voting members of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, which determines the Oscar nominees and winners. It’s made up of separate branches composed of different film disciplines, including acting, writing, and directing. 276 people were invited to join the Academy in 2013, though the number of new members changes annually.
31.76 million
Number of viewers for the lowest-rated Oscars telecast ever, which took place on February 24, 2008. Despite the Academy celebrating its 80th awards, the show pulled in a dismal 18.66 share of the ratings, thanks in part to its low-wattage winners. (Best Picture champ “No Country for Old Men” wasn’t a big box office draw, prompting fewer viewers to tune in.)
57.25 million
Number of viewers for the second-highest rated Oscars telecast ever, when “Titanic” took home Best Picture and Billy Crystal hosted on March 23, 1998. The exact number of viewers for the highest rated ceremony — which took place on April 7, 1970, when “Midnight Cowboy” won the top prize — are not available, but the program pulled in a whopping 43.40 share of the Nielsen ratings. (In comparison, 1998’s ceremony had a 35.32 share.)
1 billion
Number of worldwide viewers that the Academy has claimed in the past watch the Oscars every year. This number has been widely disputed, though, and with the recent trend in waning viewership, it seems even more suspect today

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